Publications & Papers

Publications

See my academia.edu profile for the latest information on my publications. 

Books/dissertation:

Music – Psychoanalysis – Musicology. Edited by Samuel Wilson. Abingdon and New York: Routledge, 2018.

An Aesthetics of Past-Present Relations in the Experience of Contemporary Art Music’. PhD dissertation. Royal Holloway, University of London, 2013.

Book chapters

‘Musical Time in a Fast World’, in The Oxford Handbook of Time in Music. Edited by Mark Doffman, Emily Payne, and Toby Young. Oxford: OUP, forthcoming.

‘Introduction’ in Music – Psychoanalysis – Musicology. Edited by Samuel Wilson. Abingdon and New York: Routledge, 2018.

‘Does the Psychoanalysis of Music Have a “Subject”?’ in Music – Psychoanalysis – Musicology. Edited by Samuel Wilson. Abingdon and New York: Routledge, 2018.

‘Valentin Silvestrov and the Symphonic Monument in Ruins’ in Transformations of Musical Modernism (eds. Julian Johnson & Erling E. Guldbrandsen), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015, pp. 201-220.

Journal articles/reviews

‘[Book review] Tim Rutherford-Johnson, Music After the Fall: Modern Composition and Culture Since 1989.’ Twentieth-Century Music (in press, 2017).

The Composition of Posthuman Bodies’, International Journal of Performance Arts and Digital Media, special issue on ‘Bodily Extensions and Performance (Avatars, Prosthetics, Cyborgs, Posthumans)’, Vol. 13/2 (2017): pp. 137-152.

After Beethoven, After Hegel: Legacies of Selfhood in Schnittke’s String Quartet No. 4’, International Review of the Aesthetics and Sociology of Music, 45/2 (2014), pp. 311-334.

 ‘Building an Instrument, Building an Instrumentalist: Helmut Lachenmann’s Serynade’, Contemporary Music Review, Vol. 32/5 (2013), pp. 425-436.

SMA TAGS Day for Postgraduates’, Society for Music Analysis Newsletter (July, 2009).

 


Conference and seminar papers

‘Vibrant Matter and Musical Materials’ [invited talk], Sonic Materialities Research Series, Bath Spa University, Jan. 2018.

‘The Composition of Posthuman Bodies’, Tenth Biennial International Conference on Music Since 1900, University of Surrey (Sept. 2017).

Adorno’s Concept of Musical Material During and After the New Materialisms’, 6th Conference of the Royal Musical Association Music and Philosophy Study Group, King’s College London (July 2017 – accepted).

‘Musical Time in a Fast World’, Making Time in Music: an International Conference, University of Oxford (Sept. 2016)

‘New Music, New Materialisms: Musical Material and Materiality after Adorno and during the New Materialisms’ [poster presentation], 52nd Royal Musical Association Annual Conference, Guildhall School of Music and Drama (Sept. 2016).

‘Does the Psychoanalysis of Music Have a “Subject”?’ at Annual Conference of the Royal Musical Association’s Music and Philosophy Study Group, King’s College, University of London (July 2015).

‘Immateriality in the Arts and Practice: Introduction and Framing Statements for Conference Panels’ [stream convenor’s framing statements for three interrelated conference panels] at London Conference in Critical Thought 2015 (Stream: ‘Immateriality in the Arts and Practice’), University College London, University of London (June 2015).

‘New York, 1983: Or, Sounding the Temporal Logic of Late Capitalism’ at London Conference in Critical Thought 2014 (Stream: ‘Time Discipline’), Goldsmiths College, University of London (June 2014).

‘Silvestrov and the Symphonic Monument in Ruins’ at RMA Study Day: Memory in Post-1980s Music: History, Form, Perception, University of York (Feb. 2014).

‘Musical Analysis, Dream Analysis: Silvestrov’s String Quartet No. 1’ at RMA Music and Psychoanalysis Study Day, The University of Liverpool (Nov. 2013).

[Above paper also presented (in an extended form) at Transformations of Musical Modernism International Seminar, Centre Franco-Norvégian en Sciences Sociales et Humaines (Paris, Oct. 2011).]

‘The Object(s) of Musical Experience: Potentials for Cross Disciplinary Dialogues’ London Conference in Critical Thought, Birkbeck Institute of the Humanities, University of London (June 2012).

‘Building an Instrument, Building an Instrumentalist: Helmut Lachenmann’s Serynade for Solo Piano’, Symposium for Performance of Electronic and Experimental Composition: “Building an Instrument”, University of Oxford (Jan. 2012).

‘Confronting Self-Understanding in Alfred Schnittke’s String Quartet No. 4 (Second Movement)’, Postgraduate Day, Royal Holloway, University of London (Nov. 2011).

‘Semiotics of Past and Present in Silvestrov’s String Quartet No. 1: Musical Analysis, Dream Analysis’, Transformations of Musical Modernism International Seminar, Centre Franco-Norvégian en Sciences Sociales et Humaines (Paris) (Oct. 2011).

‘“Bodies of Knowledge”: the Historicity of Expression in Contemporary Music’, Royal Musical Association Student Conference, University of Manchester (Jan. 2011).


Ph.D. thesis

In June 2013 I completed a Ph.D. in Music at Royal Holloway, University of London, in which I explored contemporary art music’s relationship with the past. This is considered in the context of aesthetics and debates surrounding late twentieth-century modernism. This was supervised by Regius Prof. Julian Johnson.

My thesis can be downloaded here. A summary follows:

An Aesthetics of Past-Present Relations in the Experience of Late 20th- and Early 21st-Century Art Music

Focusing on a selection of musical works from within three genres – symphony, string quartet, and the piano repertoire – I argue that the experience of music from the late 20th and early 21st centuries must be understood in terms of its mediation by the continued presence of the past, not simply through reference to past musical formal materials, but also to the history of experience as musically mediated. Following this logic, I explore a discursive strategy based around philosophical tensions central to the aesthetics of post-Enlightenment musical experience – in particular, the dialectics of nature and culture, and of mind and body. This allows me to interweave closely strands of musicological and philosophical thought, exploring and developing the latter as they have been taken into, exhibited, and played with in a range of late modernist works. I focus on works that draw attention to their historical situatedness, music by Wolfgang Rihm, Helmut Lachenmann, Giya Kancheli, Valentin Silvestrov, Alfred Schnittke, Thomas Adès, Morton Feldman, and Jukka Tiensuu. I draw on, though outline the need to take forward, Theodor Adorno’s understanding of the historical qualities of musical material, yet also foster an understanding of musical experience situated between past and present without recourse to explicitly postmodern quotation or “intertextuality”, something I implicitly critique. Through illustrating points of affinity and convergence between musical works and experiential issues, I pull together seemingly disparate methodological approaches. These include musical semiotics, Critical Theory, embodied phenomenology, and psychoanalytic theory.

My thesis contains eight chapters, which fall into three parts:

  • The first – ‘Material Past, Material Passed: the Symphony’ – explores dialectical constructions of nature and culture in symphonies by Silvestrov and Kancheli. These I discuss in light of modern conceptions of space, monumental ruins, and nostalgia. I also outline how materialist, object-like conceptions of musical material might be developed in light of these and other recent modernisms.
  • The second – ‘Music in Mind, Mind in Music: the String Quartet’ – investigates historical notions of subjectivity in string quartet writing, and late 20th-century composers’ reactions to these legacies. Musical subjectivity is considered in terms of knowledge, desire, and fantasy (dreaming), in music by Rihm, Schnittke, Tiensuu, Silvestrov, and Feldman.
  • The third – ‘Bodies of Knowledge: the Piano’ – turns from the musical mind back to the body. I show how past ways of performing and experiencing piano music are drawn on and developed in Lachenmann’s Serynade (1997-98), and how legacies of dancing bodies are exploded in Schnittke’s Piano Quintet (1972-76) and, more recently, in Adès’s Mazurkas (2009).
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s